Farmers: Unofficial Taxes on Rice Too High

Villagers in Prey Veng province who export rice to Vietnam ac­cused border police and district of­ficials on Wednesday of extorting too much money from them.

Keo Sam Ien, a 49-year-old far­mer in Peam Chor district’s Koh Sampov village, said higher unofficial taxes are making it difficult for him to earn a profit from selling rice.

Farmers complained that taxes on 1 ton of rice have increased to 17,000 riel (about $4.25) from 5,000 riel (about $1.25) last year. One ton of rice sells for about $130, farmers said.

In November, Prime Minister Hun Sen approved an order to crack­down on the illegal export of un­­milled rice in the face of a country-wide drought and food shortages.

The measure aimed to prohibit farmers from selling unmilled rice to middlemen and buyers in neighboring countries, where the rice is milled and sold back to Cam­­­bodians at a higher price.

Minister of Agriculture Chan Sar­­­un said Wednesday that far­mers can sell rice to neighboring countries for personal needs, such as earning money to pay for fertilizer.

When asked about the ban on rice exports, he said “at the beginning we seemed to be strict, but we could not prevent such ex­port.”

Chan Sarun added that rice selling should not be taxed. He said he would ask officials to investigate whether taxes on rice are le­vied.

Despite the ban, 63-year-old far­mer Im Sann appealed to the gov­ern­ment to lower the price of un­of­ficial taxes so that farmers can make a profit.

“We would like the government to resolve this problem,” he said, ad­ding that he sold 8 tons of rice to Vietnamese dealers this month.

Suon Sovath, police chief for Peam Chor district, said his officers were not involved in taking money, but said that border police might be culpable.

Tim Phan, Prey Veng provincial police chief, denied border policemen are extorting money from Prey Veng farmers.

But, he said, bor­der police and district officials did take money from the Viet­namese dealers.

Tim Phan said he would investigate if he receives complaints.

Related Stories

Latest News

The Weekly DispatchA new weekly newsletter from The Cambodia Daily delivering news, analysis and opinion to your inbox. Published every Friday at 11:30am. Sign up today.